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Wednesday, March 10, 2021


On March 3, 2021, I had my ten (10) minute oral argument in my Second Amendment Lawsuit before the Appellate Division of the New York Supreme Court, Fourth Department.  


A decision is expected by the Fourth of July, some 1000 days after I applied for a pistol permit in New York.

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Saturday, February 27, 2021

Court Refuses Request to Record Oral Argument

By Letter dated February 23, 2021, the Appellate Division of the Fourth Department informed me that my request to record the Zoom Oral Argument in my Second Amendment cases was denied, stating: "the court will not permit the recording of oral argument."

Curious behavior for the guardians of our Freedoms.  Do they have something to hide?

So the only chance to hear the Oral Arguments which will address the conflicts between the fundamental right to self defense and to keep & bear "arms" and New York's improper curtailing of those rights is by sending an email request to watch this Oral Argument to the Clerk at: ad4-calendar-clerk@nycourts.gov requesting the credentials to watch this Oral Argument.


DATE

DOCKET

TIME

Wed Mar 03

10:00 a.m.

OP 20-00556

Sibley v Steuben County Licencing Officer Chauncey Watches

10:00 a.m

Wed Mar 03

10:00 a.m.

OP 20-00776

Sibley v Steuben County FOIL Lawsuit

10:00 a.m



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Tuesday, February 16, 2021

Black History Month, Dred Scott & Me

Montgomery Blair
Montgomery Blair
Dred Scott
Dred Scott












I thought it appropriate at the half-way mark of "Black History Month" to add my two bits of Black History which necessarily includes "White History"; as if the two really can be separated.

On July 4, 1854, Dred Scott publishes a pamphlet, concluding: "I have no money to pay anybody at Washington to speak for me.  My fellow-men, can any of you help me in my day of trial?  Will nobody speak for me at Washington, even without hope of other reward than the blessings of a poor black man and his family?  I do not know.  I can only pray that some good heart will be moved by pity to do that for me which I cannot do for myself; and that if the right is on my side, it may be so declared by the high court to which I have appeal.

By December 30, 1854, when the Supreme Court docketed Dred Scott v. Sandford, no attorney had stepped forward.  Yet, Montgomery Blair agreed to take up a case so unpopular that no one in D.C. was willing to take it and risked his career.  Why?

Montgomery Blair stated in a letter on December 24, 1856, “I believe in the Southern Sates, almost every lawyer feels bound to give his services when asked in such a case arising in the community to which he belongs.”

 In 2007, I gave a 25-minute lecture on Montgomery Blair and the Dred Scott case and how it impacted Montgomery Blair personally.



While I won't here sketch out the history and impact of the Dred Scott case as that is a book length chore, the March 6, 1857 decision by Chief Justice Taney held that the federal Constitution created a "perpetual and impassible barrier" between whites and blacks. This barrier defined blacks as a "subordinate and inferior class of being," with no natural rights. 

We have come a long way, though obviously not far enough.

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